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About the Frog Listening Network

The best conservation is done at the local level. And because amphibian populations are declining worldwide, we need to monitor the populations of frogs and toads that we have right here in Florida. It is difficult to assemble a professional team to do this, which is why we rely on the help of volunteers.

The Frog Listening Network (FLN) is a volunteer-based monitoring program in which the public is trained to collect data about frog and toad populations in west-central Florida. Volunteers learn how to identify amphibians both audibly and visually. You do not have to be a scientist to be a part of the Frog Listening Network, and volunteers of all ages and backgrounds are welcome. We provide free trainings complete with educational materials such as full-color field identification cards to help you learn each amphibian species and their individual calls. We'll also teach you how to collect and record frog population data in a way that's fun and easy.

Amphibians are considered "sentinels" of environmental health because of their sensitive skin. By watching them and keeping track of their populations, we can begin to understand the health of the environment. Although the FLN is similar to other amphibian monitoring groups across the country, the FLN is the only group of its kind in west-central Florida. The Frog Listening Network has received several awards from the Governor's Council for a Sustainable Florida for Excellence in Environmental Education, Initiative, and Leadership in 1997, 1999, and 2001, respectively. The Southwest Florida Water Management District also recognized the Hillsborough River Watershed Alliance for Outstanding Leadership in Water Resource Education for its work through the Frog Listening Network in 2004.

Calendar of Events

Additional Resources

  • Amphibian website - The Institute of Food and Agricultural Science (IFAS) has a frog and snakes web page.

Frog Image Slideshow

Frogs Being Monitored

Select a frog to view species details, hear audio samples and view photographs.

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Barking Treefrog Hyla gratiosa
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Bronze Frog Rana clamitans clamitans
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Bullfrog Rana catesbeiana
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Cuban Treefrog (invasive) Osteopilus septentrionalis
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Eastern Narrow-mouthed Toad Gastrophryne carolinensis carolinensis
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Eastern Spadefoot Toad Scaphiopus holbrooki
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Giant Toad (invasive) Bufo marinus
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Gopher Frog Rana capito aesopus
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Green Treefrog Hyla cinerea
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Greenhouse Frog (invasive) Eleutherodactylus planirostris planirostris
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Little Grass Frog Pseudacris ocularis
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Oak Toad Bufo quercicus
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Pig Frog Rana grylio
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Pinewoods Treefrog Hyla femoralis
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River Frog Rana heckscheri
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Southern Chorus Frog Pseudacris nigrita verrucosa
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Southern Cricket Frog Acris gryllus dorsalis
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Southern Leopard Frog Rana sphenocephala
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Southern Toad Bufo terrestris
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Spring Peeper Pseudacris crucifer bartramania
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Squirrel Treefrog Hyla squirella